Sunday, August 28, 2011

GOOGLE is building its open-source chat software, WebRTC, into Chrome.

Google is building its open-source chat software, WebRTC, into Chrome.

Google will probably integrate it with Gmail, which is already a huge communication hub for so many people.
But the fact that Google is using open-source software suggests that the company wants third-party developers to build WebRTC into Web applications.
In a blog post, Google wrote that it wants "to implement this technology for use by the broader web community," and that they've "engaged with the standards communities such as IETF and W3C working groups to define and implement a set of standards for real time communications."
Microsoft/Skype should be shaking in its boots.

#MICROCHIP : Egg and chips like you have never heard before !

By Ethan A. Huff

It will monitor your calorie intake, show from where your food was sourced, and even let you know when the food in your fridge is about to go bad — these are some of the enticing claims made by the developers of a new system that embeds edible radio frequency identification (RFID) chips directly into food. Its creators insist the technology will revolutionize the way humans eat for the better, but critical-thinking onlookers will recognize the ploy as just another way to track and control human behavior.

Developed by Hannes Harms from the Royal College of Art in London, the “NutriSmart” system is based on the idea that RFID wafers injected directly into food can help better track the food supply chain, further automate the supermarket shopping experience, and simplify the eating experience by programming data into food so that humans essentially do not have to think about what they are

The technology makes both eating and dealing with food in general mindless, as a person simply needs to plop an RFID-embedded food item onto a special RFID-laced plate, which then tells the person all about the item and how much of it to eat. RFID ovens and microwaves also eliminate having to think about how long to cook an RFID food item — simply put it in the RFID microwave, oven, or toaster, and the machine will know exactly how long to cook the item.
As interesting and novel as this might sound, such technology is actually quite frightening when taken to its logical ends. NaturalNews previously warned that mad scientists have already developed edible RFID tags for use in pharmaceutical drugs (…). These tags, of course, can and will likely be used to monitor patients’ compliance with doctors orders, and alert authorities if a patient refuses to take certain pills as prescribed.

This 1984-esque scenario appears to be more than just science fiction — it is unfolding before our eyes just a little bit more every single day. And the NutriSmart system is just another piece of evidence that those in power wish to micromanage every single aspect of our lives, from the drugs we take to the foods we eat.